Researcher sheds new light on how brain operates like GPS

Every time you walk out of a building, you immediately see where you’re at and then step toward a destination. Whether you turn left, right or go straight ahead, you don’t even think about it. Simple, right?

Not exactly. The brain performs a complex calculation that works a lot like the Global Positioning System.

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Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat

An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told “You are so smart” vs “You did very well this time.”

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Inattentive kids show worse grades in later life

Researchers studied children with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and found that inattentiveness was linked to worse academic performance up to 10 years later, regardless of ADHD, even when they accounted for the children’s intellectual ability.

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Child’s Home Learning Environment Predicts 5th Grade Academic Skills

Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

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Do you read stories to kids? Ensure moral lessons have greater impact with these types of books

A study from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto shows kids aged 4-6 learn social lessons, like sharing or telling the truth, most effectively from a certain type of book.

The results may surprise you.

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Personality Outsmarts Intelligence in the Classroom

A recent study found that personality is more important than intelligence when it comes to children’s success in the classroom.

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Guided Play: Learning “Takes Shape” in Preschool

Guided play, or discovery learning, is an inquiry-based teaching method where teachers are coaches who create interest-driven experiences. In this study, guided play improved preschoolers ability to learn geometric shapes — an essential component to school readiness– over other types of instruction.

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Dramatic Play: Little Actors, Big Results

There’s a concept first brought to light decades ago, but still very relevant in education today: How do students’ past experiences impact their current understanding? How can educators create experiences to engage students and enhance learning? One teacher found answers in dramatic play.

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Building Brain Habits: Sharing Chores

Join us for our first post in a new series from our founder, Nancy Rowe.

A teacher of mine once commented, “language begins with the idea in the mind of the child.”  I have never forgotten the truth of that moment. 
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