Rethinking Gifted Education

Gifted education is a broad term to describe programs and practices used in the education of students who demonstrate exceptional abilities to learn or reason. Currently, more than 3 million students are enrolled in gifted programs nationwide. But gifted programs may not be the best learning environment for some students, according to a new study. 

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Write-To-Read: Improve Reading Skills With Purposeful Writing

Early childhood is a crucial time for children’s reading and writing development. Children who lag behind in the early years usually encounter considerable difficulties throughout their academic careers. A recent study tested an exploratory write-to-read method in first grade classrooms as an alternative reading program.

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Are You Better With Numbers or Words?

We usually think of math and reading skills as two distinct abilities; you’re either good with numbers or words. A new study may debunk this notion that our brains are either adept at math or reading.

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Learning to Read Today: Emojis, Photos, and More

Technology dominates every aspect of our lives: how we work, how we live and how we communicate. A recent study in the Journal of Early Childhood Research examines our communication and looks at how it is affecting children learning to read. Continue reading “Learning to Read Today: Emojis, Photos, and More”

Kindergarteners and iPads: Sharing is Key

To give children iPads in school, or not – that is the question. The ‘correct’ answer to this question still remains a bit of a mystery. The use of iPads in the classroom has caused a political uproar in some school districts.

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Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved

A recent study published in the Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, investigates how families have supported their children’s early literacy and how this support has evolved over the past century. Continue reading “Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved”

Moving for Math

A classroom full of children waving their arms up and down, jumping, and tapping to the beat may sound like a gym class, but these movement exercises are actually designed for the classroom to help children learn math and writing.

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Distracted Now, Pay Later.

Children experience many phases and changes during their school years, and its tempting to think they will grow out of most of their difficult phases. But a new study shows that children with early attention problems are at risk for worse academic outcomes in high school.

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Boys and Girls Learning to Read: It’s A Mixed Bag

Experienced teachers know that students learn in different ways and often take different paths to get to the same learning outcome.  According to a recent study, such differences are especially prevalent when boys and girls are learning to read. In fact, international research shows that in all age groups, girls outperform boys on measures of reading. This new study on gender differences aims to understand why this gender based performance gap exists and to gain insight into how it can be reduced.

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Toddler Tantrums? Tame Them With Talk

Angry outbursts like temper tantrums are common among toddlers, but by the time children enter school, they’re expected to have more self-control. In a longitudinal study published in Child Development, researchers  sought to determine whether developing language skills relates to developing anger control.

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