Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?

It’s been commonly accepted that each individual student has a favored learning style: visual (spatial), aural (auditory), verbal (linguistic), and physical (kinesthetic). Educators profess that by hitting each learning style in a lesson, success for all students is nearly guaranteed. And teachers have been directed to make sure that their instruction addresses each. Have we been misled?  Continue reading “Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?”

Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key

Teachers make all the difference in education. We aren’t just talking about academics, but also in how they impact students’ lives. Given the power of teacher-student relationships, education research can’t ignore the intricacies of this group’s dynamics. Continue reading “Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key”

Toddler Tantrums? Tame Them With Talk

Angry outbursts like temper tantrums are common among toddlers, but by the time children enter school, they’re expected to have more self-control. In a longitudinal study published in Child Development, researchers  sought to determine whether developing language skills relates to developing anger control.

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It’s Not Over Their Heads: Spatial Language in Kids’ Activities

We use spatial language in everyday activities. Stating “the pail is next to the boy” provides a definition of visual space. Phrases like “on the table, under the bed, behind the door” are very important for young children who are learning about their visual space world and how to follow directions through practical life learning.  Once a child becomes school age, they need to use language in order to follow directions quickly and accurately and to master new social and educational learning.

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