Moving for Math

A classroom full of children waving their arms up and down, jumping, and tapping to the beat may sound like a gym class, but these movement exercises are actually designed for the classroom to help children learn math and writing.

Continue reading “Moving for Math”

Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?

It’s been commonly accepted that each individual student has a favored learning style: visual (spatial), aural (auditory), verbal (linguistic), and physical (kinesthetic). Educators profess that by hitting each learning style in a lesson, success for all students is nearly guaranteed. And teachers have been directed to make sure that their instruction addresses each. Have we been misled?  Continue reading “Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?”

5 Brain Myths That Harm Our Children

Are you left-brained or right-brained focused? Do we really only use 10 percent of our brain?

Many of us have pondered over these questions at one time or another, and some of us may even believe we have a definite answer to one or more of these kinds of brain teasers. However, a scientific study informs us that there is no validity to these questions as they are actually neuromyths, or unscientific ideas about the brain. Continue reading “5 Brain Myths That Harm Our Children”

It’s Not Over Their Heads: Spatial Language in Kids’ Activities

We use spatial language in everyday activities. Stating “the pail is next to the boy” provides a definition of visual space. Phrases like “on the table, under the bed, behind the door” are very important for young children who are learning about their visual space world and how to follow directions through practical life learning.  Once a child becomes school age, they need to use language in order to follow directions quickly and accurately and to master new social and educational learning.

Continue reading “It’s Not Over Their Heads: Spatial Language in Kids’ Activities”