Mirror neuron activity predicts people’s decision-making in moral dilemmas

Mirror neurons play a vital role in how people learn through mimicry and feel empathy for others. Researchers found that the brain’s inferior frontal cortex is more active in people who are more averse to harming others when facing moral dilemmas. Continue reading “Mirror neuron activity predicts people’s decision-making in moral dilemmas”

‘Mind’s eye blink’ proves ‘paying attention’ is not just a figure of speech

When your attention shifts from one place to another, your brain blinks. The blinks are momentary unconscious gaps in visual perception and came as a surprise to the team of Vanderbilt psychologists who discovered the phenomenon while studying the benefits of attention.

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Car, stroller, juice: Babies understand when words are related

The meaning behind infants’ screeches, squeals and wails may frustrate and confound sleep-deprived new parents. But at an age when babies cannot yet speak to us in words, they are already avid students of language.

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Spacing out after staying up late? Here’s why

Ever sleep poorly and then walk out of the house without your keys? Or space out while driving to work and nearly hit a stalled car? A new study led by UCLA’s Dr. Itzhak Fried is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells’ ability to communicate with each other.

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Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety

Boosting activity in brain areas related to thinking and problem-solving may also buffer against worsening anxiety, suggests a new study by Duke University researchers. Continue reading “Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety”

Brain activity is inherited, may inform treatment for ADHD, autism

Every person has a distinct pattern of functional brain connectivity known as a connectotype, or brain fingerprint. A new study conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, concludes that while individually unique, each connectotype demonstrates both familial and heritable relationships.

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Getting emotional after failure helps you improve next time, study finds

Perhaps it is best to beat yourself up a little the next time you fail at a task.

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Researcher sheds new light on how brain operates like GPS

Every time you walk out of a building, you immediately see where you’re at and then step toward a destination. Whether you turn left, right or go straight ahead, you don’t even think about it. Simple, right?

Not exactly. The brain performs a complex calculation that works a lot like the Global Positioning System.

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How should we handle boys who can’t read?

Many people know that girls, on average, are worse at math than boys. But the gender difference is three times greater when it comes to reading. According to international studies, this is where boys struggle.

Why? And what can be done about it? For starters, children who struggle most with learning to read could be identified earlier than is currently done. And now, researchers are finding new ways to do this. Continue reading “How should we handle boys who can’t read?”