Kindergarteners and iPads: Sharing is Key

To give children iPads in school, or not – that is the question. The ‘correct’ answer to this question still remains a bit of a mystery. The use of iPads in the classroom has caused a political uproar in some school districts.

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How Your Child’s Weight Affects School Readiness

A recent study in Early Childhood Research Quarterly ventures into largely unchartered research territory. While previous research has examined how extra weight may inhibit children’s ability to perform optimally, most studies haven’t differentiated between weight classes, such as overweight and obese. Further, there are few studies which examine the performance of underweight students in wealthy countries.

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Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved

A recent study published in the Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, investigates how families have supported their children’s early literacy and how this support has evolved over the past century. Continue reading “Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved”

Moving for Math

A classroom full of children waving their arms up and down, jumping, and tapping to the beat may sound like a gym class, but these movement exercises are actually designed for the classroom to help children learn math and writing.

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Low Engagement? Try Standing Desks

Physical activity, even acute and less intense levels, has beneficial effects on cognitive ability. We know that standing while working has increased health benefits for adults. Now researchers have found that children who stand at their desks in the classroom are more engaged and attentive than their seated peers.

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Distracted Now, Pay Later.

Children experience many phases and changes during their school years, and its tempting to think they will grow out of most of their difficult phases. But a new study shows that children with early attention problems are at risk for worse academic outcomes in high school.

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Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?

It’s been commonly accepted that each individual student has a favored learning style: visual (spatial), aural (auditory), verbal (linguistic), and physical (kinesthetic). Educators profess that by hitting each learning style in a lesson, success for all students is nearly guaranteed. And teachers have been directed to make sure that their instruction addresses each. Have we been misled?  Continue reading “Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?”

5 Brain Myths That Harm Our Children

Are you left-brained or right-brained focused? Do we really only use 10 percent of our brain?

Many of us have pondered over these questions at one time or another, and some of us may even believe we have a definite answer to one or more of these kinds of brain teasers. However, a scientific study informs us that there is no validity to these questions as they are actually neuromyths, or unscientific ideas about the brain. Continue reading “5 Brain Myths That Harm Our Children”

Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key

Teachers make all the difference in education. We aren’t just talking about academics, but also in how they impact students’ lives. Given the power of teacher-student relationships, education research can’t ignore the intricacies of this group’s dynamics. Continue reading “Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key”