A ‘touching sight’: How babies’ brains process touch builds foundations for learning

Touch is the first of the five senses to develop, yet scientists know far less about the baby’s brain response to touch than to, say, the sight of mom’s face, or the sound of her voice.

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Car, stroller, juice: Babies understand when words are related

The meaning behind infants’ screeches, squeals and wails may frustrate and confound sleep-deprived new parents. But at an age when babies cannot yet speak to us in words, they are already avid students of language.

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Bilingual preschoolers have better impulse control, study finds

Preschoolers who speak two languages show less impulsiveness than their single-language peers, say University of Oregon researchers whose project was seeded after they met in a graduate psychology course.

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It’s Not Over Their Heads: Spatial Language in Kids’ Activities

We use spatial language in everyday activities. Stating “the pail is next to the boy” provides a definition of visual space. Phrases like “on the table, under the bed, behind the door” are very important for young children who are learning about their visual space world and how to follow directions through practical life learning.  Once a child becomes school age, they need to use language in order to follow directions quickly and accurately and to master new social and educational learning.

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