Dramatic Play: Little Actors, Big Results

There’s a concept first brought to light decades ago, but still very relevant in education today: How do students’ past experiences impact their current understanding? How can educators create experiences to engage students and enhance learning? One teacher found answers in dramatic play.

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Learning to Read Today: Emojis, Photos, and More

Technology dominates every aspect of our lives: how we work, how we live and how we communicate. A recent study in the Journal of Early Childhood Research examines our communication and looks at how it is affecting children learning to read. Continue reading “Learning to Read Today: Emojis, Photos, and More”

How Your Child’s Weight Affects School Readiness

A recent study in Early Childhood Research Quarterly ventures into largely unchartered research territory. While previous research has examined how extra weight may inhibit children’s ability to perform optimally, most studies haven’t differentiated between weight classes, such as overweight and obese. Further, there are few studies which examine the performance of underweight students in wealthy countries.

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Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved

A recent study published in the Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, investigates how families have supported their children’s early literacy and how this support has evolved over the past century. Continue reading “Early Literacy: How Parent Involvement Has Evolved”

Low Engagement? Try Standing Desks

Physical activity, even acute and less intense levels, has beneficial effects on cognitive ability. We know that standing while working has increased health benefits for adults. Now researchers have found that children who stand at their desks in the classroom are more engaged and attentive than their seated peers.

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Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?

It’s been commonly accepted that each individual student has a favored learning style: visual (spatial), aural (auditory), verbal (linguistic), and physical (kinesthetic). Educators profess that by hitting each learning style in a lesson, success for all students is nearly guaranteed. And teachers have been directed to make sure that their instruction addresses each. Have we been misled?  Continue reading “Learning Styles: Were Teachers Misled?”

Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key

Teachers make all the difference in education. We aren’t just talking about academics, but also in how they impact students’ lives. Given the power of teacher-student relationships, education research can’t ignore the intricacies of this group’s dynamics. Continue reading “Teacher-Student Relationships: Students Hold The Key”

Preschool Interventions: How Accurate Is The Research?

Early childhood educators are grateful for the work that researchers do to increase our understanding of the field of preschool education and how improve it. However, no one study alone can solidify advances –- research-based progress comes from the sum of findings as a whole, not just the parts.  Continue reading “Preschool Interventions: How Accurate Is The Research?”

Boys and Girls Learning to Read: It’s A Mixed Bag

Experienced teachers know that students learn in different ways and often take different paths to get to the same learning outcome.  According to a recent study, such differences are especially prevalent when boys and girls are learning to read. In fact, international research shows that in all age groups, girls outperform boys on measures of reading. This new study on gender differences aims to understand why this gender based performance gap exists and to gain insight into how it can be reduced.

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